Sandra Tessier - RE/MAX Property Spec. Grp. Inc.


Moving your old apartment furniture into a new home can be awkward and frustrating. The pieces that once filled your small studio are now dwarfed by the size of each room. It seems no matter how you arrange them nothing makes them any bigger.

This also always seems to exasperate feeling that all of your furniture is boring and drab. It’s outdated, cheap looking and not nearly up to parr with your beautiful new house.

I hear you. But this doesn’t mean you need to toss it all out to start completely from scratch. And it’s not the wisest time to seek financing for swanky new pieces after just wrapping up the house buying process. Instead, try these tips:

Start by rearranging which furniture is used in which room. Just because it has always been used in your bedroom does not mean a piece needs to stay there. Simply moving it to fit in with the decor of another room could bring it whole new life. Give it a try! I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

Replace and/or remove hardware from existing pieces. This can modernize an old favorite and make a cheaper piece feel more upscale. Look for either antique pulls or some sleek new t-bar handles. You may even want to remove hardware completely to create a sleek, clean look.

Ask family and friends if they have any pieces they are looking to get rid of or swap for a piece you’re tired of but they love. Keep in mind when considering these pieces what changes can be made to them if they aren’t the perfect fit at first glance. Can they be repurposed or given a facelift?

There are few things a coat of black or white paint can’t freshen up. You may also want to consider other neutral tones like grays, browns and navy blues. If the piece has millwork consider painting it two colors to give it a drastic new look.

Give outdated finishes an update with metallic spray paint. Whichever finish you have your heart set on you will be sure to find at your local hardware store. Whether you want a new metallic tone or a bright fun color painting a piece can change it into something that feels entirely new.

Add new smaller pieces that are more affordable to add to your decor. They can distract from the pieces they’re rooming with and create a more modern, updated look. Pick up items you love from your favorite stores and keep an eye out on places like Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace.

While browsing used pieces for sale if you find a great deal keep the above tips in mind when considering to make a bid. Many times you just need to flex your imagination to find the perfect decor for you!


This Single-Family in Bow, NH recently sold for $295,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Sandra Tessier - RE/MAX Property Specialists Group Inc..


1 Rosewood Drive, Bow, NH 03304

Single-Family

$322,000
Price
$295,000
Sale Price

4
Bedrooms
10
Rooms
2
Baths
Need storage for cars, boats, or have a hobbies this 2-story barn 28x32 which has water and electric may but perfect for you!! Also you can enjoy your in-ground pool! With the pool comes a 4-bedroom/2-bath colonial/gambrel style home with updated kitchen and baths! Vinyl exterior and vinyl windows. Hardwood and tile flooring. Dining room with wood burning fireplace. Newer kitchen appliances. Finished lower level with 2-rooms that could be an exercise room, play room and/or office. Newer septic system. Nice flat lot complete with a 2-story barn which has water and electric. Great location with east access to Route 3, I-93 and Exit 11. Seller offering $4,800. towards Buyers closing cost.




This Single-Family in Merrimack, NH recently sold for $238,750. This Colonial style home was sold by Sandra Tessier - RE/MAX Property Specialists Group Inc..


72 Tinker Road, Merrimack, NH 03054

Single-Family

$238,500
Price
$238,750
Sale Price

4
Bedrooms
7
Rooms
1
Baths
Convenient Merrimack location! Colonial style home with 3-4 bedrooms with newer metal roof, vinyl windows and vinyl siding. Walk-out lower level is finished and has a large picture window. 1-car attached garage and covered breezeway. Private back yard with shed. This home has 1-bathroom but there is room on the 2nd floor to add an additional bath. Home needs some updating (paint/flooring). Location is convenient to shopping and major highway routes.




Houseplants are a great way to make your home feel more comfortable, colorful, and--in the winter--to bring a bit of living nature back into your life until spring arrives.

There are houseplants that will thrive in just about any location of your home. Plus, you can find houseplants that are low-maintenance or ones that are a bit more rewarding as you care for them and watch them grow.

In today’s post, I’m going to list the best houseplants for each room of your home. I’ll cover “impossible to kill” low-maintenance plants and some that require a bit more work. I’ll also cover large and small plants, as the size will often depend on the available space in the rooms of your home.

Read on for the list of the best houseplants for each room of your home.

Bedroom

The bedroom is a place for rest and relaxation. You don’t want anything too high maintenance or too big and bright. Lavender gives off a calming scent that is perfect for your cozy sleeping space.

Lavender is relatively low-maintenance, just be sure to water sparsely in the winter time, and only when the soil has dried out completely to avoid root rot.

Lavender works in other rooms as well, such as on a kitchen windowsill where it can be used for cooking.

Bathroom

The bathroom tends to be a humid place without much spare room. A single aloe vera plant near a light source can be a great accent.

Extremely low maintenance and useful after a day out in the sun, the bathroom is a perfect home for aloe vera. Simply snap off a leaf and use the gel inside for your burn.

Office

There are a few choice places for plants in the home office. A large snake plant in the corner of the room is a great way to add some life and color. Similarly, a money tree is easy to care for and fun to watch grow as you braid its stem (and what’s a more fitting place for a money tree than the place where you make your money!?).

For the desk, a small cactus or succulent will do the trick, as you don’t want it to take up too much room.

Living room

For the living room, we can finally start talking about some of the bigger houseplants on the list. A Norfolk Island Pine looks like a small pine tree (though it technically isn’t one) and it can grow several feet high indoors. This is a great choice for homeowners in colder climates who don’t want to fill their house with unfitting tropical looking plants.

Palm and Yucca, on the other hand, are perfect for homes in warmer climates. They can grow several feet high and fill up empty spaces in a large living room with ease. There’s a reason these are used in so many hotel and office building lobbies--they’re easy to care for and can grow large enough to fill the void in a big building.

Windowless rooms

Most plants will need at least indirect sunlight to stay healthy through the year. But, if you have a windowless room in your home that you want to brighten up with a houseplant you have options.

Dracaena, snake plants, and creeping fig all grow well in little to no light and are easy to take care of.  


Sharing living expenses with your partner or roommates can be a difficult and confusing issue for many.

 Life would be made much easier if there was just one bill to pay on your home that includes everything.

 Recently there have been attempts to bring such a suction into fruition. Many homeowners and renters have turned to apps that help them split expenses, or have signed up for mortgage agreements that cover stray expenses like property tax and private mortgage insurance.

 In this article, we're going to give you a few tips on splitting the bills in your home to make things easier for you, your spouse, and your roommates.

Who pays what?

Many young couples are often left wondering who should pay which bill, especially when you share so many services.

However, there's a big difference between sharing a Netflix account and sharing a car. One solution is to use the bills that report to credit agencies for whoever needs help building their credit score.

Putting credit cards under the person with the lowest score’s name can help them build credit even if they're simply listed as an “authorized user” which means you can take advantage of good interest rates and build credit at the same time.

Paying the mortgage

It can quickly become tiresome having to write two different checks each month for your mortgage or rent. To solve this problem, you can either alternate payments (you pay a full month’s rent or mortgage one month and your spouse pays the following month), or you can choose to pay bi-weekly, which will help you pay off your mortgage sooner.

The best apps to use

If you live with your spouse, you likely aren’t overly concerned with splitting all of your expenses 50/50. Chances are whoever has the higher income will foot the bill for the larger expenses.

However, if you have roommates there’s a bigger chance you’ll want things to be split evenly between you and the other members of the household. That’s where apps come in handy.

First, sit down with your roommates and go over all expenses. Write down each bill that you share: rent, heat, electricity, cable, internet, gas, insurance, and so on.

Then, decide who is responsible for making the payment on those bills. Even if you decide to split them all evenly, one person will have to be responsible for sending out the check each month.

Once you’ve determined which bills you have and who is going to pay them, it’s time to find out how you’re all going to contribute.

One way is to open up a shared account. Doing so can be messy, however, if you’re using that account for multiple bills. Some banks and services also charge a portion of the transfer, so you’ll each be losing money each month, and the amount depends on how many bills you have.

Some apps and services you can use to split bills and transfer money include Splitwise, Mint, PayPal, and Chase’s QuickPay. The benefit of apps that don’t transfer money is that they are often free and don’t collect transfer fees. So, if you’re comfortable with handling money by hand, you could save in the long run.




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